Mint: Planting And Care In The Open Ground, Growing On The Windowsill

The herbaceous perennial plant peppermint (Mentha piperita), or English mint, or cold mint, or cold peppermint, or peppermint, is a species of the genus Peppermint, belonging to the family Elmeraceae (Spearmint). This species was obtained by hybridization of water mint and spearmint (garden mint). This plant was considered very valuable even in ancient Roman times; its leaves were used to rub furniture and mint tincture was used for spraying the premises. In ancient Egypt, mint was placed in the tombs of the pharaohs. This crop was named after the nymph Mentha transformed into a bush with a pleasant, delicate but very cool aroma.

Mint is very popular in English cuisine, there it is used as a spice for a sauce for lamb. In America this plant is used as an ingredient in vegetable or fruit salads, and as an additive to mixed drinks and tomato juice. Peppermint is also used to make medicines with various effects.

Properties of Peppermint

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

Mint has a horizontal, branching rhizome with thin, lobed roots. The hollow straight upright tetrahedral stem is 0.

3 to 1 m high and covered with short hairs. The opposite opposite opposite short-cell-shaped leaves have an oblong ovate shape, heart-shaped at the base and acuminate toward the apex, with a sharply serrated edge. The front surface of the leaves is dark green, while the underside is paler. Leaf blades are 30-50 mm long and 15-20 mm wide. Spike-like inflorescences consist of small lilac-colored flowers.

Flowering lasts from the last days of June to September. The fruit consists of 4 cenobium nuts. But the formation of these fruits is extremely rare. This plant is an extremely valuable honey producer, and the resulting honey has an amber color and a distinct mint smell.

Growing mint on your windowsill

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

How to sow

Growing mint from seeds on your windowsill is comparatively easy.

The pot with the seedlings can be placed on a windowsill or on a veranda or heated loggia. The first thing to do is to prepare the soil mixture. To do this you need to combine the peat, garden soil, humus or sand, taken in equal parts. The prepared substrate should be calcined in an oven. Seeds can be bought in a special store or collect their own.

Their sowing is carried out in a moistened soil mixture, and it is necessary to make furrows in it with a depth of about 50 mm. After the seeds are evenly distributed in them, the furrows should be carefully embedded. Cover the container with cling film on top and put it in a well-lit and warm place.

Home care for mint

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

Sow mint and take care of the seedlings in the same way as any other crop. The first shoots should appear after 15-20 days, after that the container with them should be moved to a well-lit place to prevent the plants from pulling out.

If the seedlings will be lack of light, they will need artificial lighting. Seedlings grow best at a temperature of 20 to 25 degrees. But if this culture is grown in a lack of light then the seedlings should be kept cool (15 to 17 degrees). Once the plants have grown, they can be planted in the garden if desired and can also be kept as indoor plants.

Mint plants growing in the house need a care adjustment at different stages of the growing season.

For example, in the summertime during the most intensive growth the substrate must not be allowed to dry out as this can lead to death of the plants. Also, if the mint lacks water, there is an increased risk that pests will settle on it. In winter, watering shrubs should be very carefully, because in the cold season it is dangerous to allow overwatering the substrate. As the winter in the room heating devices, the humidity during this period is very low, and therefore shrubs should not forget to systematically moisten the sprayer with water at room temperature. Mint should be protected from draughts, as well as she needs to be protected from diseases and a variety of pests.

In general, it is easy enough to grow peppermint at home.

How to sow peppermint at home? Growing mint from seeds on a windowsill.

Sowing mint in the open field

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

When to plant

Sowing mint in the spring time in April, and this procedure can also be done in summer, more precisely in the first days of August. Planting seedlings grown from seeds as well as cuttings should be done from the middle to the end of May.

The site for planting mint should be sunny or in the penumbra.

Experienced gardeners recommend that there should be no different berry, flower and vegetable crops within a radius of 0,6-0,8 m from the bush, otherwise you will grow a bush of low quality. This crop should be grown as far away as possible from cabbage, cucumbers and beet as this undesirable neighbourhood may cause dark spots to form on the leaves.

Suitable soil

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

This crop should be grown in soil that has been previously manured for the preceding plants. The soil should be moist, loose and nutrient-dense, e.g.

chernozem would be ideal. Bushes grown in lime soil have a faint odor. Acidic and waterlogged soil is also not suitable for mint because the bushes grow very weak on it.

After a suitable plot for such a plant is found, it should be carefully prepared. To do this, remove all weeds from the plot, then dig it to a depth of about 20 centimeters, while adding 3 kg of humus, 2 big spoons of wood ash, as well as 15 grams each of ammonium nitrate, superphosphate and potassium chloride per 1 square meter.

In areas with a high groundwater table higher beds should be made for this crop.

When growing mint it should be considered that this plant is able to invade areas not intended for it, displacing other crops. Therefore when planting mint plants around the perimeter of the plot you should dig in some stopping blocks, for this purpose we recommend the use of plastic or pieces of slate.

Planting rules

Per plants in open soil should be planted in previously prepared grooves which should be approximately 50 mm deep and 0.4 meters wide with a distance of 0.

3-0.5 meters between bushes. These grooves should be filled with soil, compacted a little, and then watered well.

GROPING A Mint Bush | HOW TO GROW?

Growing a mint outside in the garden

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

Growing mint on your plot is quite easy. This plant is very easy to care for; it requires timely watering, additional nutrition, weeding, loosening of the soil and protection against diseases and pests.

How to water

Water in the evening and water often as long as the mint plants take root. It is easiest to loosen up the soil on the plot and weed after the bushes have been watered.

Fertilizer

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

Fertilize this plant only once a season in the springtime. Cover the area with a layer of mulch (either compost or peat mixed with wood ash).

Gathering rules

Gather the mint during mass flowering.

The fact is that the bushes during this period contain the greatest amount of essential oil. Once the raw material is harvested, the bushes grow back and the plant yields again.

How to preserve Mint for winter? The best ways!

What to grow after mint

This leafy crop is a good precursor for root crops, namely turnips, carrots, turnips and beets. Potatoes can also be cultivated in this area.

Mint diseases with photos and names

The greatest danger to mint is a disease such as rust.

This fungal disease develops under conditions of low temperature with high humidity, as well as due to the large amount of nitrogen in the soil and failure to follow crop rotation rules. Affected bushes have dark reddish pads on the underside of the leaf plates.

Mildew

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

Mildew can also cause damage to such a plant. Affected specimen in the second half of summer is covered with a whitish spider web coating that appears on leaf plates and shoots. As a preventive measure in autumn the plot is plowed over to the depth of 0.

2 meter and then the bush is sprayed with colloidal sulfur solution (1%).

Verticillosis wilt

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

Mint is also sometimes affected by verticillosis wilt, which is also a fungal disease. The diseased plant has several upper pairs of leaf laminae that turn black. As the disease progresses, the plant dies. To prevent this disease, experts advise, strictly adhere to the rules of crop rotation, in the autumn time to clean the site from plant residues, which should be burned, and experienced gardeners recommend growing those mint varieties that are resistant to wilting, for example, Priluki 6.

Antracnose

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

Antracnose can also affect this crop. The diseased bush has brown spots on the leaf plates. To get rid of the disease, the bush should be sprayed 3 or 4 times with a solution of Bordeaux mixture (1%). For preventive measures in fall it is necessary to dig over the area.

Septoriosis

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

If mint is suffering from septoriosis (spotting), black spots and brown angular spots about 0.

8 cm in size appear on its leaf plates which are bordered with black rims. This disease can be treated in the same way as anthracnose, namely the plant should be sprayed several times with a solution of Bordeaux mixture (1%).

Growth

The greatest danger to this crop is a disease called overgrowth, which is caused by mycoplasmas. It causes the affected bush to cease growing, leaves to turn a different color from the mint, and the root system to stop growing. To date, this disease is considered incurable.

As soon as an infested bush is noticed on the site, it should be dug up and burned as soon as possible, and the remaining plants should be transplanted to another site. As a preventative measure, you should try to prevent pests from settling on mint, as they are the main carriers of this dangerous disease.

Pests of mint with pictures and names

A very large number of pests usually settle on mint.

Mint flea

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

The mint flea, which is a small yellow-colored beetle only 0.15 centimeters long, that gnaws round holes in the leaf plates, may appear on the bush.

This flea occurs most often in spring if the weather is warm and dry.

Green Shieldworm

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

It may also infest shrubs by gnawing holes in the edges of leaf blades. Holes on the leaves of such a plant may also appear because of the leaf beetle.

Aphids

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

Aphids are a very great danger not only to mint, but to all plants. This very small insect is capable of causing great harm to almost any crop.

This pest settles on the bush in large colonies, and they prefer to locate on the underside of the leaf plates. The aphid pierces the surface of the leaves and sucks the sap out of them. Such shrubs experience stunted development and growth, and they also stop forming full-fledged leaf plates. It should also be remembered that this pest is the most important vector of dangerous viral diseases that cannot be cured.

Cicadas

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

Sucking pests are also cicadas, usually settling on young bushes.

Lonk beetles

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

Lonk beetles are also quite dangerous to this crop. The larvae of this pest eat the roots of the bush and the adult beetles bite off the edges of the leaf blades.

The meadow moth

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

The meadow moth is capable of destroying an entire plant on its own.

In southern regions, the moth often lives in the soil and winters about 10 centimeters deep. And from early May until the end of summer, the mite sucks the sap by settling on the tops of stems.

Saliva pennywort

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

The larvae and adults of salivary pennywort can also attack the bush. On the bush where they have settled, the stems are distorted and foamy lumps are formed in the leaf axils and on the shoots.

If there are dense thickets of couch grass nearby or if the mint is grown in an area where potatoes were growing that year, it is likely that the bush will be bothered by wireworm, which is the larvae of the laceworm beetle. This pest gnaws at the roots of the plant.

More annoying to this crop may be the moth, caterpillars of the cabbage moth, round-winged moth, burdock moth and meadow moth.

Experienced gardeners prefer to prevent pests from settling on mint bushes, so they resort to preventive measures. Once every couple of years, it is necessary to replace the area allocated for the cultivation of mint. And when the bushes will be removed, the vacated area should be subjected to deep recultivation. When the harvest is collected, it is necessary to be sure to collect and burn all plant residues. If harmful insects still settled on the bushes, it is recommended to spray them with a concentrated infusion of celandine.

To prepare such an infusion, you need 200 grams of dried leaves of celandine combined with 10 liters of water, after a day the mixture should be poured grated soap. However, if such an infusion is ineffective, the bushes should be sprayed with Decis solution, and such treatment should be carried out not later than 4 weeks before harvesting.

Mint species and varieties with photos and names

There are practically 25 species and 10 subspecies of peppermint known. Those that are most popular will be described below:

Garden mint

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

The powerful bush is about 0.9 m tall.

This species does not have the strong cooling effect that peppermint has, as the main component of this plant is an essential oil called carvone. It is commonly used in soft drinks and teas as well as to flavor toothpaste.

Curly Mint

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

It is about 0.8 to 0.9 m.

tall. This mint, unlike other species, has curly leaves and a high resistance to frost. Its leaves do not have the strong menthol flavor of peppermint. This plant is quite popular in cooking and is also used in non-conventional medicine, so, decoction of leaves is used as a sedative, for pain relief in injuries and for healing baths.

Apple mint

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

The bush is about 0.

6 m tall. The dark green, velvety leaf plates have a rounded shape. The odor of such a plant is not very strong compared to that of peppermint. This mint is used to add to meat dishes, various drinks, soups and salads as well as to baked goods and desserts.

Longleaf Mint

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

The powerful bush is about 1.

5 meters tall. Its rhizome is creeping and its shoots are tetrahedral and split. The coloring of the leaf plates is dark green, and their edge is serrated. The bushes have a delicate and pleasant smell, so this mint is used as a supplement to vegetable broths, salads and soups, but also to some meat dishes, for example: grilled beef or kebabs. The leaves of this plant are added to marinades for preserving eggplants and are also used as a spice for pickling cabbage.

This species is also used in the perfume industry, particularly in soap making.

Field mint, either horse mint or wild mint

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

This species is widely distributed in nature and is therefore found everywhere. The bushes are about 0.8 meters tall. The leaves do not have the strong aroma and cooling menthol flavor that peppermint has.

Dried or fresh leaves are used as an additive in beverages such as tea, baked goods, fish dishes, salads, vegetable soups and sauerkraut during pickling. Decoction of this plant is used to treat inflammation and headaches.

Lemon Mint

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

The plant is about 100 centimeters tall. Branched upright shoots have slight pubescence. The supratennially arranged leaf blades are roundish-ovate and have a serrated edge.

The front surface of the leaves is dark green, while the underside has a paler tint. It has a minty, lemon-like pleasant scent and medicinal properties. This species also has a second name, lemon balm.

Scented Peppermint

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

This perennial plant has a persistent upright stem that reaches 0.4-1 meters in height.

The wrinkled leaf plates are green in color and have a cream-colored stripe along the edge. These leaves have a pleasant scent. This mint is widely used in cooking, and it has also been used in folk medicine since ancient times because of its medicinal properties.

Did you know how many varieties of Mint there are?

In addition to these varieties, gardeners cultivate house mint, Moroccan, Korean, orange (bergamot), dogwood, prairie, water mint, etc.

Pearmint differs from all other species and is grown on an industrial scale.

There are a very large number of hybrids and varieties of this species, which are very diverse. The following varieties and hybrids are the most popular:

  1. Priluki 6. This variety has been known for a very long time, with a growing season of approximately 100 days. Its shoots are covered with a large number of leaflets. The leaflets contain about 50 percent menthol and about 3 percent essential oil.

  2. Medicinal 4. The powerful bush is about 100 centimeters tall and has a growing season of about 115 days. The leaf plates have an anthocyanin coloration and contain about 60 percent menthol and about 4 percent essential oil.
  3. An enigma. This variety was created by Ukrainian breeders.

    The green leaflets do not have anthocyanin coloration. The duration of the growing season of this variety is about 110 days. The foliage contains up to 65 percent menthol and 3.5 percent essential oil.

  4. Charming.

    A variety created by Belarusian breeders. The bush is about 0.7 m tall and its lower part has a purple-red color. This variety has the formation of seeds, so scientists doubt that it is related to the peppermint species.

  5. Ukrainian Peppermint.

    The variety is high yielding and resistant to drought and disease. The foliage contains about 53 percent menthol and about 61 percent essential oil.

  6. Udaychanka. This high-yielding, non-legume variety is resistant to cold weather. The essential oil contains about 47-52% menthol.

The following peppermint varieties are quite popular among gardeners: Simferopolskaya 200, Zagrava, Zarya, Vysokomentolnaya, Silver, Amber, Medichka, Moskvichka, Krasnodarskaya 2, Kubanskaya 6, etc.

Mint properties: health and benefits

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

Mint medicinal properties

The flowers, leaves and stems of mint contain bitter, tannin and bioactive substances, fats, sugars, phytoncides, vitamins C and P, mineral salts, carotene, essential oil that includes menthol.

This plant is used in both official and non-conventional medicine for nervous disorders, headaches, toothache, asthma, throat diseases, cardiovascular diseases, insomnia, neuralgia, inflammations of the digestive system, colds, bronchitis, atherosclerosis and other diseases.

Menthol is characterized by anesthetic, antimicrobial and antispasmodic effects. It is recommended that mint be used internally to dilate coronary vessels in cases of angina pectoris and pain in the stomach or intestines.

External use of peppermint is recommended for bronchitis, neuralgia or toothache. Menthol can be found in rhinitis ointments, mouthwash mixtures, Zelenin drops and in Valocordine.

Tinctures and infusions made from the leaves of this plant can improve digestion, increase appetite and relieve vomiting and nausea. Mint is used as an analgesic for colic attacks of the liver, as a choleretic for gallstones or jaundice and as a heart stimulant.

In Germany the leaves are used as ingredients in medicinal teas for flatulence and gastrointestinal ailments.

In this country mint baths are also popular. Peppermint is used in Australia for preparing tinctures and decoctions. The leaves of this plant in Poland is used in the treatment of inflammation of the periosteum, middle ear, as well as for migraines, insomnia and neuralgia. Peppermint is included in herbs intended to improve odor and taste. In Russia, in alternative medicine, mint leaves are used as a choleretic, diaphoretic and refreshing remedy.

Wild mint leaves are used to make a juice used in the treatment of kidney stones. If this juice is mixed with white wine, the mixture has a diuretic effect. This plant is found in gastric gatherings, teas and bath gatherings. It is also widely used in perfumery and cooking.

What Mint Does! (The Real Benefits and Harms of Peppermint)

Contraindications

Some people have an individual intolerance to peppermint and the products in which it is used.

This herb may cause an allergic reaction. Peppermint oil should not be used during pregnancy and breastfeeding and should not be given to children under 6 years of age. Peppermint products should not be used in large quantities by men, as this type helps to reduce libido.

An overdose of peppermint products may cause heart pain, bronchial spasms and sleep disturbances.

Recipes

Mint: planting and care in the open ground, growing on the windowsill

The following will describe popular mint recipes that will be helpful to everyone:

  1. Infusion for bad odor from the mouth.

    2 tbsp. of freshly boiled water should be combined with 1 tbsp. of mint leaves. After a couple of hours the infusion will be ready, it is used to rinse the mouth.

  2. Infusion for nausea.

    1 tbsp. just boiled water should be combined with 1 tbsp. of mint leaves, wrap the container. After 30-40 minutes the infusion will be ready. Strain the remedy by 1 tbsp.

    every 3 hours in case of pain in the stomach or nausea. And in case of vomiting drink ½ tbsp. remedy.

  3. Tincture for headaches. Combine alcohol (70%) and crushed leaf plates in a ratio of 20:1.

    The tincture will be ready after 7 days. In case of headache or nausea it is necessary to drink 10-15 drops of such a tincture.

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